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CSS Table replacement for HTML Tables

posted Mar 14, 2011, 4:47 AM by Jaco Vosloo   [ updated Mar 14, 2011, 4:50 AM ]
Use Display:table to format web pages where the <table> tag used to be needed.

http://www.digital-web.com/articles/everything_you_know_about_CSS_Is_wrong/
http://www.onenaught.com/posts/201/use-css-displaytable-for-layout

Using html <table>
Hello Before we can begin to look at form layout, we need to craft some really solid markup that will provide us with a framework to which we can add some style. Forms represent the one area of your web site where you absolutely must commit time and energy to ensure user accessibility. Even though forms represent some of the most complex interactions that can occur on a web page, in many cases these interactions are only represented visually -- via the proximity of a form element to its label, or grouping by borders and background colors. Users of assistive technology such as screen readers may not be able to see these visual clues, so it's vital that you support these users by ensuring accessibility. The key concept behind providing an accessible form is to have descriptive labeling of all its sections. Hello

Using CSS table:
Hello
Before we can begin to look at form layout, we need to craft some really solid markup that will provide us with a framework to which we can add some style. Forms represent the one area of your web site where you absolutely must commit time and energy to ensure user accessibility. Even though forms represent some of the most complex interactions that can occur on a web page, in many cases these interactions are only represented visually -- via the proximity of a form element to its label, or grouping by borders and background colors. Users of assistive technology such as screen readers may not be able to see these visual clues, so it's vital that you support these users by ensuring accessibility. The key concept behind providing an accessible form is to have descriptive labeling of all its sections.
Hello

Using CSS Float:
Hello
Before we can begin to look at form layout, we need to craft some really solid markup that will provide us with a framework to which we can add some style. Forms represent the one area of your web site where you absolutely must commit time and energy to ensure user accessibility. Even though forms represent some of the most complex interactions that can occur on a web page, in many cases these interactions are only represented visually -- via the proximity of a form element to its label, or grouping by borders and background colors. Users of assistive technology such as screen readers may not be able to see these visual clues, so it's vital that you support these users by ensuring accessibility. The key concept behind providing an accessible form is to have descriptive labeling of all its sections.
Hello

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